Blur Enables Users to Obscure Their Google Search Data

By Kimberlee Morrison Comment

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It’s almost impossible to browse the internet these days without exposing some of your data. Most companies online, especially social networks and search engines, are now big data companies exploiting user data for profit. A service from online privacy company Abine, called Blur, hopes to provide better consumer protection through anonymous web searching and other protections.

According to Abine, Google commands more than 75 percent of search engine traffic in the U.S., which gives them access to a huge trove of data. “The reality is Google represents the digital equivalent of Big Brother: every one of us is being watched,” Abine notes in a statement.

Blur counteracts Google’s data mining by offering users a simple switch to turn tracking off, while still allowing users to conduct a Google search. The service blocks search history, tracking cookies, and IP address identification, which stifles the ability of Google and third parties to track a user through time and across websites.

Blur also offers users the ability to generate strongly-encrypted passwords, one time use credit card numbers, and anonymous emails to protect inboxes from spam and other malicious emails. The premium service allows users to connect multiple mobile devices to one account, and the service will even generate a shielded phone number.

Abine CEO Rob Shavell said in a statement:

By the end of 2015, anybody who wants to use the Internet safely should be using Private Search, alongside a password manager and a secure payments service. Blur users can use the best search engine the way it used to be – simple and not nosy.

A more secure internet has been a topic of concern over the last few years. Companies have developed more tools to empower consumers to protect their privacy online. From free encryption services, to secure video chat, the market is starting to offer users affordable solutions that will protect them and their data. Seems that user data is getting more secure by the day.

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