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Tinder Puts Limits on Daters If They Don't Pay for New Premium Service

Also, older users must pay more

In the U.S., Tinder is charging its older users (28 and older) $19.99 a month, and younger daters $9.99.

How many likes does it take to get to your new Tinder limit? About 100, and after that you're out of swipes for 12 hours. That's just one of the questions Tinder users are curious about now that there are two versions of the service, a premium and free model.

Tinder, an app that matches people after they both agree to liking each other via a swipe gesture, released its paid version today. Tinder Plus also has an interesting pricing model, charging more for older users.

It will cost people 28 and older $20 a month, and those younger pay $10 for the plus version in the United States, according to reports. Also, in parts of Europe older users will pay four times as much as their younger counterparts.

The dynamic pricing appears to rest on the fact that Tinder expects some groups will be more comfortable paying higher rates than others. And going from an all-free model to a paid version is about getting as much revenue as possible from whomever is willing to step up to the premium level of service.

That service comes with a few key advantages: Daters can like as many people a day as they want, they can switch cities and swipe in locations around the world for potential mates, and they can undo swipes that eliminated potential matches by accident.

Not everyone is happy that they have to pay for unlimited swipes or that the pricing is based on age. Here is just a sampling of Twitter reactions:

Tinder, which is owned by IAC, has become a pop-culture phenomenon, popularizing the term "swipe right," which is the touchscreen-enabled gesture people make to approve of someone's profile in the app.

Today, people were looking for ways around the new Tinder limits, including changing settings on the app's clock to get more swipes before the 12-hour holding period is up. Also, Tinder relies on Facebook for age, so changing that on the social network could result in a lower monthly rate. It was unclear if these workarounds would be effective or for how long.

As the app matures it is looking for a path to profits, and the premium service is one route.

The other is advertising. Marketers have shown an interest in the dating app and its growing audience. Tinder is in talks with Facebook and Twitter about serving mobile ads on the free version of the app, according to re/code. 

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