Mondelez's Sour Patch Kids Rolls Out Snapchat to Target Millennials | Adweek Mondelez's Sour Patch Kids Rolls Out Snapchat to Target Millennials | Adweek
Advertisement

Sour Patch Kids' Snapchat Effort Is a First for Mondelez Brands

Aims to turn pranks into social-video gems

Sour Patch Kids has launched a five-day Snapchat campaign, which marks parent Mondelez International's initial foray on the smartphone app as well as the candy brand's first time utilizing social media influencers. The campaign—which is dubbed "Real-life Sour Patch Kid"—enlists social media star Logan Paul to take over the brand's Snapchat account while documenting pranks that he’s pulling in New York this week.

"Snapchat is a quick, easy and fun way to communicate that provides a different kind of creative expression than other platforms," explained Mondelez's Farrah Bezner, marketing director for the consumer-goods company's candy division.

Each day this week, Logan will post a Snapchat Story to Sour Patch Kids’ account detailing one of his high jinks. The theme of the Snapchat messages will change during the course of the week from "sweet" pranks to "sour" Snaps. The tone falls in line with the brand's "first they're sour, then they're sweet" tagline.

For example, the first 70-second message sent today shows a giant Sour Patch character splashing water and throwing crackers at Logan. But at the end of the clip, the character shifts his attitude and gives Logan a cup of water to drink.

The candy brand promoted the @SourPatchSnaps Snapchat account last week on Facebook and Twitter. Snapchat content will also be supported through other social channels this week, too.

Logan will also post to his own Snapchat and Twitter account to promote the Sour Patch Kids content.

Besides Snapchat, Sour Patch Kids has also tested other out-of-the-box types of mobile and social advertising, including partnerships with mobile advertising company Kiip and social tool Prankstr as part of the Mondelez Mobile Futures program.

The CPG giant's Mobile Futures started last year as a company-wide initiative to allocate 10 percent of marketing spend towards mobile for a handful of brands.

Advertisement