Dunkin' Donuts' ESPN Vine Spots Play on Super Bowl Memories | Adweek Dunkin' Donuts' ESPN Vine Spots Play on Super Bowl Memories | Adweek
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Dunkin' Donuts' New Vine Spots Play on Super Bowl Memories

Coffee brand's social drive keeps matriculating down the field

Dunkin Donuts ESPN Vine

Dunkin' Donuts, which has scored social-media points all football season with its Vine-ESPN play, is extending that initiative through Super Bowl weekend with a dedicated push. 

The brand last night published the first of three fun, historical, Super Bowl-themed Vines that will appear as animated, five-second commercials during ESPN's SportsCenter over the next few days. The spots are being promoted via the Twitter accounts for Dunkin' Donuts (495,000 followers) and the sports channel (8.7 million followers), as well as Facebook pages that collectively claim 21 million fans.

With agency Hill Holliday leading the way, paid ads (Promoted Tweets, Sponsored Posts, etc.) are also appearing on the two popular social media platforms. In addition, the animated videos are featured on a "Dunkin' Replay" microsite that lives on ESPN.com. (It's worth noting that, while Vine is normally a six-second video unit, the Canton, Mass.-based company's vids here last only five seconds to fit ESPN's broadcast "billboard" ad product.)

The quick-serve retailer kicked off the Vine effort by reminding Buffalo Bills fans of Scott Norwood's kick that missed in 1991 and ultimately cost their beloved hometown team the game. (See Vine below.) Two other examples rolling out during Super Bowl week consist of William "The Refrigerator" Perry's memorable touchdown tumble in the 1986 edition of the big game and John Elway's famous "helicopter" quarterback scramble that came 13 years later.

Indeed, the set of Vines seems more likely to spike foot traffic at Dunkin' locations in Chicago and Denver compared to Buffalo.

At any rate, the brand looks to garner a material piece of the big-game buzz without actually buying a $4 million Super Bowl spot.

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