Jim Frederick Named Editor of Time International | Adweek
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Jim Frederick Named Editor of Time International

Move leaves vacancy at Time.com
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There’s been another change at Time magazine. Jim Frederick, the managing editor of Time.com, was promoted to editor of Time International. That job was last held by Michael Elliott, who left in June to run Bono’s ONE charitable foundation.

Time International has lost some of its prowess in recent years, but Rick Stengel, managing editor of Time, said he plans to "go all in" with the brand.

In Frederick, he picked someone with digital skills (he took on the website in 2010, succeeding Josh Tyrangiel, who went to Bloomberg Businessweek); international skills (as a senior Time editor in London, he helped coordinate overseas coverage, and reported from Tokyo and Iraq), and business chops, thanks to an MBA he earned from NYU.

"Domestic is a shrinking market. By putting Jim in there, who understands Time.com, business—there aren't many journalists with an MBA—it's a vote of confidence in international," Stengel said. "China is a different market for us because we're in the news business and they don't like the news business. We're looking at different editions in different places. Even the European market is still growing. The Asian markets are another area of growth."

Frederick will give up his role at Time.com but remain an executive editor at Time. A search for his replacement at Time.com is underway.

This is Stengel’s second recent change to the highest editorial ranks of Time. Earlier this month, he made Nancy Gibbs his deputy, sparking speculation that she could be the next managing editor.

Frederick, along with others like Radhika Jones, is part of a young crop of editors at Time that have steadily risen at the weekly.

"They're very much the generation of the future," Stengel said. "I always like to feel like the Time Inc. brand would be in very good hands, and I certainly think that's the case. I'm not going any place, but I always like to think there is a great hierarchy."