Women-Owned Startup Attentive.ly Gives Clients Social Stats of Email Subscribers

Let's face it: With email use in decline as social network use skyrockets, businesses, political campaigns and non-profits can no longer rely on email to meet their online communication needs. Enter startup Attentive.ly. Launched today and based in San Francisco and Washington, D.C., Attentive.ly seeks to “bridge the social CRM” space by assessing the social profiles of clients and aggregating their content and activity across social media channels, such as Twitter and Facebook.

Let’s face it: With email use in decline as social network use skyrockets, businesses, political campaigns and non-profits can no longer rely on email to meet their online communication needs.

Enter start-up Attentive.ly. Launched today and based in San Francisco and Washington, D.C., Attentive.ly seeks to “bridge the social CRM” space by assessing the social profiles of clients and aggregating their content and activity across social media channels, such as Twitter and Facebook.

Attentive.ly provides customers dependent upon email outreach with actionable data from social networks, like trending topics and hashtags, as well as specific high-Klout users’ interests.

By monitoring and quantifying the online presence and social activity of current email subscribers, customers, or donors and volunteers in the case of political campaigns, Attentive.ly says they can help clients engage with their email subscribers in more powerful and strategic ways.

Consider a large sales force that would like to know more about their new business prospects in order to craft a more effective pitch or offer. Political campaigns that manage tens of thousands of email addresses could evaluate the social media activity of their donors to craft a targeted appeal for support.

Attentive.ly is led by a roster of women with strong ties to the political technology industry: Rosalyn Lemieux, Cheryl Contee and Chief Technology Officer Cindy Mottershead. Contee (pictured left) is a founder of the Jack and Jill Politics, a blog featuring views and commentary of African American writers.

In an interview with SocialTimes, Attentive.ly CEO Lemieux (pictured right) adds that the platform has been in beta for close to a year, and currently has nearly 20 clients from the advocacy arena, including MomsRising, Natural Resources Defense Council, labor unions such as AFL-CIO, and the progressive think tank Center for American Progress.

Attentive.ly profiles currently link to FacebookTwitter and Linkedin. Lemieux notes that the platform will eventually incorporate YouTube, Google + and possibly other networks, such as Pinterest and Tumblr.

To expand its reach, the firm partnered with NGA VAN, a technology provider to Democratic and progressive campaigns and organizations, including President Barack Obama’s reelection campaign, who will begin offering clients Attentive.ly’s services at a discounted rate.

A list of Attentive.ly’s key features follow:

Dashboard: The dashboard gives clients an overview of supporter activity today and over time. The “watched terms” chart shows interest over time in key topics.

Filtering: Organizations can filter their results by time and segment their lists by top customers, leads, donors, volunteers, and more.

Social Reach: Organizations can also see the overall reach of their network. For example, if they match 5,000 email subscribers and on average those subscribers have 200 people in their personal social networks on average, an organization has a first-degree potential reach of 1 million.

Trend Spotting: The “Top 10’s” section allows organizations to monitor trending topics, hashtags, and news stories being shared by their email subscribers.

News Feed: This recently added feature allows organizations to see actionable changes happening on their email list — which subscribers are gaining Klout? What videos, photos, and stories are going?

Subscriber Spotlight: Under “Members to Watch,” organizations can see which email subscribers are gaining influence or have stopped talking about the organization altogether.

Searchable: Organizations can search all of their subscribers for specific words and phrases.