Windows 8 Tablet has No Flash

Wired also reports that Adobe’s Flash product has had a rough time as computing has shifted to a mobile environment. “Apple stopped shipping Flash capability with products like the 2010 MacBook Air, which gave the 11-inch model a whopping two extra hours of battery life.”

Microsoft’s new Windows 8 Metro is now on the market enhancing social media usage and, hopefully, making user’s lives easier. But, Adobe Flash and other plug-ins may not find the new product so special. Window 8 Metro’s interface will not support Adobe Flash or other plug-ins. In its place the new product welcomes the HTML5 set of web standards, according to Microsoft’s Internet Explorer team leader Dean Hachamovitch.

Hachamovitch explained in his blog that running IE without Flash or other plug-ins “improves battery life as well as security, reliability, and privacy for consumers.”

“Providing compatibility with legacy plug-in technologies would detract from, rather than improve, the consumer experience of browsing in the Metro style UI,” Hachamovitch wrote in the blog.

Adobe Flash continues with Windows desktop, which they feel is very popular with its users and will continue so for the years to come, “including rich web-based games and premium videos that require Flash,” Adobe told Wired.com in a statement.

Wired also reports that Adobe’s Flash product has had a rough time as computing has shifted to a mobile environment. “Apple stopped shipping Flash capability with products like the 2010 MacBook Air, which gave the 11-inch model a whopping two extra hours of battery life.”

Other devices like QNX-powered BlackBerry PlayBook operating system and Android use Flash. Reports from techies such as developer for GroupMe messaging app say Adobe Flash is cumbersome and disappointing.

I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but HTML5 has come to be in reality the option for functions that previously required Adobe Flash. Wired.com spoke of the back-end system Brightcove now uses HTML5 to deliver streaming video to devices like the iPad. Since March of this year, 63% of web video is now HTML 5 compatible, a strong signal that interest in using Flash is waning.