FashionWorld Users Demand Facebook Credits Back, Start Care2 Petition

FashionWorld, a social game on Facebook has found itself in hot water with users who are demanding justice and blaming Metro Games for not being more responsive. When consumers now pay with virtual currency for virtual goods, how do you reach a virtual justice?

FashionWorld, a social game on Facebook has found itself in hot water with users who are demanding justice after player’s stores disappeared. Users are claiming FashionWorld has been unresponsive and have started to collaborate online to seek help. There are claims that counters are not working, Facebook credits taken while machines break and many times what a player ‘builds’ in their store completely vanishing. One user summed it up on FashionWorld’s discussion tab “Gift giving messes up, machines breaking a few minutes after I put clothes on them, can’t receive gifts, clothes disappearing from machines. I used to love the game but I hate playing it anymore.” Another user went as far as starting a Care2 petition online as the problem seems to be affecting thousands of paying users. For the actual petition click here.

Other users feel betrayed by Metro Games, the publisher of FashionWorld, for not being more responsive and think its a hardware issue:

“I have not been able to receive gifts from my neighbors for over three weeks, and I had over a hundred of gifts and requests sitting in my request box. After a while, my gifts and requests disappeared and I have new ones, this time 75 and still no way of getting the gifts sent. The other bother is the game bogs down when there are too many customers in my shop or a neighbors shop, can’t do anything when it is too busy, so the server of the game NEEDS work”


What do you think the resolution should be, shutting the game down or crediting players while fixes are put in place?

When consumers now pay with virtual currency for virtual goods, how do you reach a virtual justice? In light of Google’s announcement of Buzz privacy Class-Action settlement yesterday, consumer web-rights are front page this week. Elections might be over but the online fight for rights has only started, what should gaming companies be learning from this?