Facebook Self-Publishing Ventures Keep Cloning

Since our January list of five different services that turn Facebook profiles into books, the number of offerings grown to at least seven. Either the customer base is growing or other types of self publishing are falling out into this space.

Since our January list of five different self-publishing services that turn Facebook profiles into books, the number of offerings in the space has grown to at least seven.

Our sister blog Social Times has recently profiled two of the more recent additions to this space: YearlyLeaf and JotJournal.

I have no doubt that all seven (as of this writing, that’s the number of such services, but if you come across this post subsequent to April 4, I wouldn’t be surprised if the number of offerings went up) of the publish-your-Facebook-activity ventures could have started development at the same time, but for whatever reason, Ninuku Archivist came out of the gate first in November.

We’ve wondered whether the continued proliferation of offerings signals a growing customer base for hard copy versions of one’s profile, or perhaps some other trend. Maybe companies doing self publishing of other types of books have lost steam and capturing Facebook content seems like a logical repositioning.

Self-publishing means that the author pays out of his or her own pocket to get a book published, a model typically embraced by authors unpublished elsewhere. However, changes in the media business have motivated some professional writers to seek out self publishing options.

Whatever the explanation for the growth, the question still remains whether there’s enough money to be made in creating hard copy versions of something already available for free online. We don’t yet know the answer, but will read one in whether these services have any staying power.

So, readers, tell us, would you pay money for a hard copy book rending of your Facebook activity?