Americans Believe Online Video Is Becoming More Offensive, Sexual & Pervasive

Business video platform provider Qumu today released some interesting stats about trends in online video. Most notably they reported that Americans who have watched online video over the past year reported that they believe that videos are becoming more offensive, more sexual and more pervasive.

Business video platform provider Qumu today released some interesting stats about trends in online video.  Most notably they reported that Americans who have watched online video over the past year reported that they believe that videos are becoming more offensive, more sexual and more pervasive.  Read on to find out more.

According to a press release, Qumu discovered these emerging trends via an online survey of 2,361 Americans aged 18 and older who are online and have watched video in the past year.  They found that these online viewers “believe the number-one ranked trend in online videos is that they are becoming more offensive (34%).  This was followed by the belief that videos are becoming more: sexual (28%), pervasive (21%), funny (18%), interesting (15%), addictive (9%), and important (6%).”  It should be noted that the online video viewing community has also grown exponentially over the last year.  Could it have something to do with all this offensive sexual content?  Hmm…

In addition to these trends, Qumu also found that more men watched online videos than women last year, though the gap was pretty small with men at 92 percent and women at 88 percent.  18 to 34-year-old men made up the largest online video watching audience at 97%.  These guys also found that videos have become “funnier” over the past year, more than any other age group did.

Being that Qumu is a business video-related company, they also asked some questions about what people thought would make a good corporate video.  Most believed that the most interesting corporate videos would star experts in the field and coworkers.  Most also said that they would prefer to see the CEO and other employees in corporate videos over celebrities like Justin Bieber, athletes like Tiger Woods or Internet celebs.  This insight comes at an interesting time as just days ago we published an infographic from Jun Group that revealed that celebrity videos drive fewer visits to brands Facebook pages than non-celebrity videos.  It looks like the belief that many brands share—that getting a popular celebrity on board is your ticket to going viral (or, in this case, engage)—is a fallacy.

What’s your take on these statistics?  Do you agree that online video is becoming more offensive, sexual and pervasive?  We’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

Megan O’Neill is the resident web video enthusiast here at Social Times.  Megan covers everything from the latest viral videos to online video news and tips, and has a passion for bizarre, original and revolutionary content and ideas.