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Wunderman sweetens GI's mail call

Holidaycard_1WPP Group's Wunderman is spreading some seasonal cheer to U.S. troops in Iraq with an effort that puts a new spin on military "mail calls."

The direct shop has sent cards to clients and friends with a timely request: "This holiday season, our troops are far away. Here's a chance to help them feel a little closer to home." Enclosed in the multi-colored mailer is a stamped, pre-addressed envelope to a specific soldier and a pre-paid calling card ($12.50 for 45 minutes).

Copy concludes, "This phone card will make it possible for a soldier to hear the voices of the people who matter most. And if you write your thoughts on the enclosed card before dropping it in the mail, they'll know without a doubt that your thoughts are truly with them."

"What we do usually is send out a card to clients and friends and say,  ‘a donation has been made in your name'," said creative chief Joel Sobelson, who came up with the idea for the card.  This year  "... we’re looking to do something a little deeper." He said he was tired of the yearly drill that happens when holiday time rolls around. Designing a card usually becomes simply a task—with the directions: "Make it good. Your ass is on the line."

Wunderman got the names from Anysoldier.com, a Web site that provides addresses of soldiers in harms way who don't receive a lot from home. The site currently has over 700 contacts.

"If anybody needs cheering up it's the soldiers oversees," said Sobelson.

AdFreak seconds that.

—Posted by Lisa van der Pool

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