Does this mean Ty-D-Bol makes a good baby name? | Adweek Does this mean Ty-D-Bol makes a good baby name? | Adweek
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Does this mean Ty-D-Bol makes a good baby name?

Ikea_bib1Call us dull, but we’ve always liked the stiff upper-lip simplicity of British names like  Henry, Edward, George, Victoria and Elizabeth, those dignified monikers infused with the rich, centuries-old traditions of kings and queens. Now we learn that the House of Tudor is being replaced by the household flat pack of Sweden. Bounty, a U.K. marketing firm which provides starter kits of baby products to consumers, reports that names like Ikea, for little girls, turned up among the country’s more than 600,000 births registered over the past twelve months. (During that time boys were branded with more silver-spoon pedigrees like Moet.)  It’s thought the Madison Avenue inspiration for baby names lies in recent “original” high-profile offspring like Gwyneth Paltrow’s ‘Apple’ and the name ‘Chardonnay’ popularized by a character on the kitschy British TV hit Footballers’ Wives. But clearly, if babies ‘Ikea’ and ‘Moet’ are any indication, U.K. Mums aren’t willing to settle for such commodity status, looking instead for the kind of brand distinction that only millions of ad dollars can buy.   

—Posted by Noreen O'Leary

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