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NBC Shuts Down The Michael J. Fox Show

Peacock’s third new Thursday night sitcom is a goner

The Michael J. Fox Show

NBC’s beleaguered Thursday prime-time lineup continues to give the network fits, and as of this evening, the night’s lone remaining new show has been pulled from the schedule.

Effective immediately, The Michael J. Fox Show has been removed from the NBC roster. While production on the sitcom’s 22 episodes wrapped some time ago, the seven unaired installments have been set aside.

According to Nielsen live-plus-same-day data, The Michael J. Fox Show averaged a scant 3.78 million viewers and a 1.2 in the adults 18-49 demo. The show reached its nadir on Jan. 16, when it delivered just 1.99 million viewers and an 0.6 rating in the dollar demo.

While a three-week hiatus was planned to accommodate NBC’s coverage of the 2014 Winter Olympics, Fox’s show will not return on Feb. 27. 

The news comes in the wake of NBC’s decision to cease production on Sean Saves the World. With the cancelation of The Michael J. Fox Show, all three of the Peacock’s new Thursday night comedies have failed. (Welcome to the Family was canceled on Oct. 18 after just three episodes.)

The unscripted series Hollywood Game Night will replace TMJFS and Sean Saves the World after NBC wraps its coverage of the Sochi Games. Through six episodes in its floating Monday night time slot, Hollywood Game Night is averaging a 1.4 rating.

Hollywood Game Night is expected to air in the 9-10 p.m. slot through April 3. After that, it’s anybody’s guess what the network will use to plug the gap, although the as-yet unscheduled pirate drama Crossbones perhaps could work in a pinch, were NBC to move it up from the summer rotation.

The decision to cut the cord on TMJFS comes on the heels of word that CBS had snapped up the rights to the NFL’s new eight-game Thursday night package. Live football would have gone a long way toward patching the ragged hole where Must-See TV once thrived. 

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