Mic Forgoes Banners for Native Advertising | Adweek Mic Forgoes Banners for Native Advertising | Adweek
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Mic Forgoes Banners for Native Advertising

Announces Cole Haan, Cadillac as first content partners
One of the dolls created by two female engineers Mic is highlighting in a series

A Miss Possible doll created by two female engineers that Mic is highlighting in its Cole Haan-sponsored series. Mic

Millennial-targeted Mic believes that if you want to reach young people, you have to use methods they'll pay attention to. To them, it means skipping banner and other traditional display ads that this demographic tends to ignore. Instead, the New York-based online publisher has opened up native and sponsored advertising opportunities.

"We know that millennials don't respond well to that form of advertising," Mic's ceo Chris Altchek said of display ads. "Our readers really trust us, and we know there's a lot of brands that are trying to develop trust with millennials."

Mic hopes that by tapping into what it knows about its growing audience of 19.8 million monthly unique viewers—with an average age of 28 and 80 percent of whom attended college—it can provide lucrative opportunities for marketers and beat out its competition, including Buzzfeed and Vox. It also bolstered its content marketing team in June by hiring CRO and publisher John Schneider, who founded Blank Screen Ventures, and director of brand products Brianne Garcia, who came to Mic from Complex Media, where she served as content marketing manager.

For example, Altchek said, Mic noticed that its readers enjoyed stories about entrepreneurship and innovation. Its first partnerships with Cole Haan and Cadillac—a 10-part series on female leaders changing their industries and a 10-part series on how company leads are reinvigorating their businesses in unique ways, respectively—reflect that interest but maintain the same tone Mic has in all of its editorial content.

"We're covering a diversity of issues all with the same consistencies, with the same philosophical, smart and engaging perspective," Altchek said. 

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