What's New: Portfolio By Mark Dolliver | Adweek What's New: Portfolio By Mark Dolliver | Adweek
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What's New: Portfolio By Mark Dolliver

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ISLAND RECORDS
AGENCY: Cornyn Shen, San Francisco
CLIENT: Island Records, New York
MEDIUM: consumer print
CREATIVE DIRECTOR/COPYWRITER: Chris Cornyn
CREATIVE/ART DIRECTOR: Billy Shen
PHOTOGRAPHY: stock/FPG

If you're in the target audience, it's been a while since you bought a record and promptly wore it out. Under the circumstances, you'll be mildly flattered that a hip music company supposes you're capable of recalling those bygone days. The photo nicely elicits a pang of nostalgia for the obsessive enthusiasms that are part of growing up. Thus, the ad creates a likable context in which to pitch several Island albums that might appeal to post-adolescent ears. Let's face it, though: You'll never again be swept away by a new recording the way you once were. In turning its attention (and yours) back to those days, the ad doesn't help you imagine how a renewed interest in pop music could fit into your life as a grown-up. After all, even if you've sustained an interest in music, it plays a different role than it used to - more as a source of relaxation, probably, than as a soundtrack for all the melodrama endemic to one's coming-of-age.


TEAM PRO HERBICIDE
AGENCY: Bader Rutter & Associates, Brookfield, Wis.
CLIENT: Dow AgroSciences, Indianapolis
MEDIUM: trade publications
CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Mike McCabe
ASSOC. CREATIVE/ART DIRECTOR: Margaret Gompper
COPYWRITER: Karen Larson
PHOTOGRAPHER: Brian Kuhlmann

Nice doggies. I suspect lawn-care professionals have less than unalloyed affection for snarling dogs. So, this isn't the sort of visual that instantly lets readers know the advertiser is on their side. It will get attention, though. Why two dogs? "It takes two fierce herbicides acting side by side to keep crabgrass, goosegrass, spurge, oxalis and other weeds from breaking into your customers' property." Fierce herbicides? It's often more trouble than it's worth for an ad's copy to sustain the theme of the photo. There's a simple reason why: We're more receptive to exaggeration in a visual than in a text. As such, spelling out a visual metaphor can mess it up.