Ogilvy to Bow Honey Bunches With Fruit | Adweek Ogilvy to Bow Honey Bunches With Fruit | Adweek
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Ogilvy to Bow Honey Bunches With Fruit

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NEW YORK Kraft's Post cereals will make it even more convenient for time-pressed consumers to eat breakfast with the June launch of two Honey Bunches of Oats flavors—peaches and bananas—which it will introduce in a $20 million national back-to-school push in August.

The No. 3 player in ready-to-eat cereals, Post learned in focus groups that consumers' unabated rush for convenient and healthy foods extends into typically frenetic morning rituals, where many do not even have time to slice and peel fruit for their cereal.

That helps to explain why Kellogg's Special K with Berries entry two years ago notched $100 million in sales and why Kraft's own Honey Bunches of Oats with Strawberries is the No. 1 growth driver for Post. Now come Honey Bunches of Oats with Peaches and Honey Bunches of Oats with Bananas. The launch also comes months after Kellogg, which is maintaining a narrow lead over General Mills, rolled out Corn Flakes with Bananas in hopes of jump-starting the flat $6.7 billion cereal category.

The Honey Bunches advertising effort, via Ogilvy & Mather, New York, will break with a 15-second TV spot that builds on the long-standing Post cereal umbrella tag, "Anything but ordinary." The spot shows real Kraft employees in a manufacturing facility with conveyor belts carrying the new Honey Bunches SKUs. They are so enthusiastic, they can't wait to tell other Kraft employees as well as consumers about the cereals. Print ads in general interest and women's titles, freestanding inserts and cross-promotions with other Kraft brands support.

"The addition of fruits to our cereals provides a more compelling taste and health benefit for our consumers," said Doug Weekes, Post's senior category business director. "One out of every five consumers likes fruit with cereal, but their mornings were too rushed to be bothered peeling and slicing fruit. Now we've cut out that step."