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FCB, Taylor Made Loosening Up

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New Batch of Ads Explores the Wackier Side of the Golf-Obsessed
LOS ANGELES--Bedpans and makeshift pooper scoopers share the spotlight with golf pros and their gear of choice in FCB Worldwide's new campaign for Taylor Made Golf.
Seven new TV spots see the Costa Mesa, Calif., agency departing from its more staid efforts for the Carlsbad, Calif., client.
One spot, for the company's InerGel golf balls, shows a man leaving his hospital bed, IV rack in tow, and heading for the roof to practice his putts into a bedpan. Another, for the new Rescue club line, has various pros finding alternate uses for presumably obsolete long irons. Mark O'Meara uses one as a mason's trowel; Lee Janzen wields another to clean up after his pooch.
Other spots tout Taylor Made's new SuperSteel woods and irons.
Martin Sheen provides the voiceover for the commercials, which are supported by print executions.
"The category can be a bit stiff and stodgy," said FCB executive creative director Scott Montgomery. "We wanted to get deeper into the company and what drives them to make better clubs and balls."
"We just wanted to have some fun with it this year," said Tim Fuhrman, management supervisor on the account. "We're not showing golfers on a course; we're showing the obsession."
The ads were directed by Tate and Partners' Baker Smith, whose credits include Arnold Communications' memorable "Sunday Afternoon" spot for Volkswagen. They broke during last weekend's network and cable golf programming.
Montgomery said the media buy is particularly convenient "because it's totally concentrated. You know exactly where your audience is with golf."
Chris Brown and John Zegowitz were the creative directors on the campaign. Bob Rayburn was the art director, Chris Deninno the writer and Bob Belton the executive producer.
Spending was undisclosed. FCB has handled Taylor Made's estimated $20 million account for eight years.