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Former Subway Pitchman Jared Fogle Is Sentenced to Over 15 Years in Prison

For sex crime and child porn charges

Fogle had a 15-year relationship with Subway. Getty Images

Jared Fogle, the former Subway pitchman, was sentenced today to more than 15 years behind bars. As previously reported, Fogle was expected to plead guilty to charges related to the possession of child pornography as well as soliciting sex from minors. He accepted a plea deal. 

U.S. District Judge Tanya Walton Pratt handled the case, which centered around Fogle's interstate travel to have sex with minors as well as his possession of over 400 child pornography videos.

The case broke earlier this year after the head of Fogle's charity, Russell Taylor, was found to be using his home to create hundreds of child pornography videos, many of which Taylor sent to Fogle.

Fogle's 15-and-a-half-year sentence comprises the 188 months he will serve concurrently on the two counts. 

Fogle's defense addressed his dramatic weight loss—aided by eating at Subway—and argued that it could have impacted his sexuality.

"Once he lost weight, it seemed as though in a short time he had hypersexuality," said forensic psychiatrist John Bradford. "There are brain disorders that can be associated with sexual drive."

While Subway declined to comment on today's sentencing, the brand pointed to its previous statement on the matter: "The actions of Mr. Fogle were inexcusable and do not represent our brand values," said a spokeswoman. "That is why as soon as we learned about the disturbing allegations against him, we immediately suspended and subsequently terminated our relationship with him." 

Since the scandal began making headlines, the beleaguered sandwich chain has replaced its chief marketing officer as well as its creative agency, tapping BBDO in New York to help buoy the brand. 

Fogle has already committed to paying 14 underage victims a total of $1.4 million

The prosecution was reportedly looking for Fogle to serve roughly 12 years in prison, while Fogle's lawyers lobbied for five years. 

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