Dove's Latest Film Aims to Change Teen Girls' Attitudes About Their Physical Appearance

Brand launches partnership with Pinterest

Each young girl wants to change just one thing about themselves in latest spot.

Everyone knows what it's like to feel self-conscious about their appearance, especially teen girls going through puberty. But the circular narrative in Dove's latest film, which features a series of teen girls lamenting the one quality they would change about their appearance if they could, shows that it's all about your perspective. 

The film's narrative smartly moves from a girl who's wishing she had a different feature—straight hair, blue eyes, blonde hair—to a girl who has that exact feature but is still unhappy with her appearance.

By linking each of the girls in this way the brand's message is clear: It doesn't matter what you look like—there's always something or someone to envy, but being critical of your appearance doesn't solve anything. Instead, Dove is trying to teach girls that confidence is a universal problem, but it's also one that can be squashed with a change of attitude. 

While the new film, called "Change One Thing," from creative content agency Evidently can feel a bit like Dove is taking a page from the Always playbook—the brand's now famous "Like a Girl" campaign also worked to change how we see young girls and used a documentary style—Dove has been working empowering messages into its campaigns for years. Though, like the Always effort, the film was not scripted and shows real teenage girls as Dove's campaigns always use real women.

"Participants were selected based upon questionnaires they completed about their body confidence," Dove brand director Jennifer Bremner told Adweek. "The girls featured in the film did not know about the 'Change One Thing' film concept in advance, so their reactions that you see in the film are genuine." 

The new film comes as part of the beauty brand's latest initiative in its long-running Campaign for Real Beauty, with this effort seeking to boost the self-esteem of teen girls. The Dove Self-Esteem Project, launched in 2006, has a new partnership with Pinterest, offers women and girls access to more than 80 confidence-boosting pins, using educational curriculum developed by the Dove Global Advisory Board.  

"Dove is the leader in helping women and girls build positive self-esteem, and we do this through many different mediums," said Bremner. "Pinterest shares our commitment to champion positive content online by taking a stand against messages and images that are harmful to women's and girls' self-esteem."  

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