Want to Boost Productivity & Well-Being? Immediately Delete These Four Things From Your Routine

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By Vicki Salemi Comment

If you want to boost your productivity and improve your well-being, listen up. There are a few things you can do that don’t even require a lot of work, just a lot of tweaking, that’s all.

According to a post by Jeff Haden on Inc., there are a few things to cross off your to do list.

1. Check your phone while you’re talking to someone. If you want someone to feel special when you’re speaking with them, refrain from checking your phone. Seriously.

Haden writes, “Stop checking your phone. It doesn’t notice when you aren’t paying attention. Other people? They notice. And they care.”

2.  Use multiple notifications. We’re so accustomed to instant gratification in terms of communication whether it’s a text or a tweet. Moreover, we’re used to the notification when Outlook quickly pings you so you know you got a new message.

Newsflash: Interruptions won’t help you. Instead, they’re simply distractions.

His advice? “Focus totally on what you’re doing. Then, on a schedule you set — instead of a schedule you let everyone else set — play prairie dog and pop your head up to see what’s happening. And then get right back to work.”

3. Wait until you’re sure you’ll succeed. Instead, trust your instincts, rely on your skills and experience, and just go for it. There’s no guarantee you’ll succeed in a new job or project but guess what? You won’t know until you try. And by holding steadfast onto your comfort zone with all your might means you’re blocking learning experiences from coming your way.

If you fail, there will be opportunities to try again. And if you succeed, well then you’ll wonder what took you so long to try! Commit to giving it your best shot and “stop waiting.”

4. Talk behind someone’s back. This is where the boosting your well-being comes in. Has anything good ever come from gossip? We know it’s not nice but it’s also not productive. What positive outcome can result from trash talking a colleague?

If someone else partakes in the gossip and initiates negative fodder, refrain from chiming in. Instead, Haden advises in the piece, “Spend your time on productive conversations. You’ll get a lot more done and you’ll gain a lot more respect.”

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