New Science Fiction Novel ‘Pays Homage’ To Drudge Report

infoquake_drudge.jpgA book release, presented without comment:

IN THE ‘INFOQUAKE’ FUTURE, ALL JOURNALISTS ARE ‘DRUDGES’
New Science Fiction Novel Pays Homage to The Drudge Report

Washington, DC — In the future according to writer David Louis Edelman, all journalists are “drudges.”

Edelman’s novel Infoquake, just published by Pyr (an imprint of Prometheus Books), envisions a future where journalists are no longer tethered to large news organizations. Instead, the news is the sole domain of independent reporters with larger-than-life personalities and political agendas of their own. In an homage to The Drudge Report and its founder, Matt Drudge, these pundits and media watchdogs are called “drudges.”

“I wanted to tip my hat to Drudge in the novel,” said Edelman. “When I wrote the first drafts of Infoquake in 1998, the Clinton impeachment scandal was in full bloom. Here was a private citizen armed with little more than a personal computer, and yet his inside reporting echoed to the highest levels of government. … Whatever you think of Matt Drudge’s politics, you can’t help but admire the way he changed the face of modern journalism and paved the way for the blogosphere.”

The full, earth-tipping-off-its-access release:

IN THE ‘INFOQUAKE’ FUTURE, ALL JOURNALISTS ARE ‘DRUDGES’
New Science Fiction Novel Pays Homage to The Drudge Report

Washington, DC — In the future according to writer David Louis Edelman, all journalists are “drudges.”

Edelman’s novel Infoquake, just published by Pyr (an imprint of Prometheus Books), envisions a future where journalists are no longer tethered to large news organizations. Instead, the news is the sole domain of independent reporters with larger-than-life personalities and political agendas of their own. In an homage to The Drudge Report and its founder, Matt Drudge, these pundits and media watchdogs are called “drudges.”

“I wanted to tip my hat to Drudge in the novel,” said Edelman. “When I
wrote the first drafts of Infoquake in 1998, the Clinton impeachment scandal was in full bloom. Here was a private citizen armed with little more than a personal computer, and yet his inside reporting echoed to the highest levels of government.

“Whatever you think of Matt Drudge’s politics, you can’t help but admire the way he changed the face of modern journalism and paved the way for the blogosphere.”

Infoquake takes science fiction into alien territory: the corporate boardroom of the far future. It’s a stunning trip through the trenches of a technological war fought with product demos, press releases, and sales pitches. Drudges play a critical role in the world of the novel, allowing cut-throat companies to get a leg up on their competition. Occasionally the drudges are used as pawns by the high-tech entrepreneurs — but they’re not above a little Machiavellian scheming themselves.

With Infoquake Edelman has created a fully detailed world that’s both as imaginative as “Dune” and as real as today’s Wall Street Journal. Publishers Weekly calls Infoquake “bursting with invention and panache,” while author and publisher Chris Roberson (Here, There & Everywhere, Paragaea) labels the book “a new subgenre unto itself: the science fiction business thriller.” Infoquake will be the featured selection in the August issue of Barnes & Noble Explorations.

David Louis Edelman is a web designer, programmer and journalist. He lives with his wife Victoria near Washington, DC. Over the past ten years, Edelman has programmed websites for the U.S. Army and the FBI, taught software to the U.S. Congress and the World Bank, written articles for the Washington Post and Baltimore Sun, and directed the marketing departments of biometric and e-commerce companies. Infoquake is his first novel.