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WSJ M.E. Thomson Creates Edit. Leadership Team

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Robert Thomson, managing editor of The Wall Street Journal, announced a new editorial leadership structure on Thursday that he claims will "expedite decision-making and give increased authority and responsibility to reporters and bureau chiefs."

In a memo to staff, provided to E&P, Thomson announced the creation of a new "National, International and Enterprise Team, a triumvirate which will report directly to me and to whom the bureau chiefs will report."

He also revealed that, on July 7, "Matt Murray will become National Editor, overseeing American general and corporate news, and Nikhil Deogun will become International Editor and directly oversee our global network of bureaus and correspondents. Mike Williams will preside over a broadened Page One, being responsible for investigative reporting, as well A-heds and leders."

The entire memo, with other changes, is posted below:

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Dear All,

I am pleased to announce significant changes to the editorial leadership of The Wall Street Journal, changes which will expedite decision-making and give increased authority and responsibility to reporters and bureau chiefs. These changes will take place in tandem with the creation of a central news desk that will allow significantly enhanced co-operation between print, web and Newswires journalists, in New York and around the world.

At the heart of our new structure will be a National, International and Enterprise Team, a triumvirate which will report directly to me and to whom the bureau chiefs will report. Effective July 7, Matt Murray will become National Editor, overseeing American general and corporate news, and Nikhil Deogun will become International Editor and directly oversee our global network of bureaus and correspondents. Mike Williams will preside over a broadened Page One, being responsible for investigative reporting, as well A-heds and leders. The troika, who will become Deputy Managing Editors, will sit close together in what could prosaically be called a