Rupert Murdoch's Assailant Explains Actions at Parliamentary Hearing | Adweek Rupert Murdoch's Assailant Explains Actions at Parliamentary Hearing | Adweek
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'Jonnie Marbles' Comes Clean on Murdoch Pie Attack

'Simply put, I did it for all the people who couldn't'
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Jonathan May-Bowles, a.k.a. “Jonnie Marbles,” caused a ruckus during Rupert Murdoch’s testimony before a parliamentary committee yesterday, when he tried to throw a shaving cream pie at the media baron (and was thwarted by his wife, Wendi) shortly after tweeting, “It is a far better thing that I do now than I have ever done before #splat.”

Today, May-Bowles penned a column for the Guardian, in which he attempted to defend his actions. “I didn't do it because I wanted more Twitter followers,” he wrote. “Simply put, I did it for all the people who couldn't.”

The would-be assailant didn’t mince words in his criticism of Murdoch. “His reach is one of the most insidious and toxic forces in global politics today,” he said, going on to describe News International as “a media empire built on deceit and bile, that trades vitriol for debate and thinks nothing of greasing the wheels of power until they turn in its favour.”

But May-Bowles wasn’t just angry at the corruption within Murdoch's company: His biggest grievance, he said, was the fact that Murdoch's money and power might prevent him from ever receiving due justice.

“For a few bright moments I thought I might see justice done, keep the pie in my bag, and spare myself a night in jail,” he wrote. “Those moments were short-lived: As committee member after committee member feebly prodded around the issues and Murdoch Jr. began to dominate, I knew I was going to have to make a massive tit of myself.”

Later, while he “languished predictably” in a prison cell, May-Bowles said that he worried whether people would understand why he had performed “a surreal act aimed at exposing a surreal process,” and was concerned that his actions would detract from the scandal or result in sympathy for Murdoch.

And he claims to have been worried about Murdoch’s own feelings—since, “at the end of the day, Rupert Murdoch is just an old man,” he says. “Maybe what I was trying to do was remind everyone of that—that he is not all powerful, he's not Sauron or Beelzebub, just a human being, like the rest of us, but one who has got far too big for his boots.”