NEW YORK--The proverbial glass ceiling is alive and well in the communications industry." />
NEW YORK--The proverbial glass ceiling is alive and well in the communications industry." /> Women in advertising still face barriers to advancement <b>By Alison Fahe</b><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>NEW YORK--The proverbial glass ceiling is alive and well in the communications industry. | Adweek Women in advertising still face barriers to advancement <b>By Alison Fahe</b><br clear="none"/><br clear="none"/>NEW YORK--The proverbial glass ceiling is alive and well in the communications industry. | Adweek
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Women in advertising still face barriers to advancement By Alison Fahe

NEW YORK--The proverbial glass ceiling is alive and well in the communications industry.

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At least that's the perception among women respondents in a just-released study on 2,000 women and men in the communications field that was commissioned by the Advertising Women of New York.
The study shows that a hefty 65% of women surveyed believe that the "old boy's" network still exists and hampers career advancement, especially in advertising. However, at the same time, nearly 80% of the male respondents believe women have equal opportunity for responsibility, promotion and salary.
Women in advertising who participated in the survey, conducted by Lieberman Research Inc., painted the bleakest picture among the various communications disciplines.
For example, although the majority of respondents said their careers had matched or exceeded their expectations, women who work at advertising agencies were least likely to feel that way compared to their communications counterparts in publishing and broadcasting.
The study, called "The AWNY Report," also showed that the biggest gap between men and women in upper management is greatest at advertising agencies.
Despite the fact that 35% of women in communications report some personal experience with sexual harassment at work, 40% of the respondents believe that gender discrimination is a bigger issue than sexual harassment.
Copyright Adweek L.P. (1993)