TNS: Hispanic Ad Spend Up | Adweek TNS: Hispanic Ad Spend Up | Adweek
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TNS: Hispanic Ad Spend Up

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NEW YORK The top 10 advertisers in Spanish-language media spent a total of $256 million in the first quarter of 2007, a 3.6 percent increase from the same time last year, according to data released in early June by TNS Media Intelligence. But ad expenditures overall were down 0.3 percent to $34.93 billion compared to the same period in 2006.

"The advertising economy seems to have moved down a step in the [first] quarter, compared to where it had been in the latter half of 2006," said Jon Swallen, TNS senior vice president of research. "One potential bright spot is January performed worse than February or March. We'll see if that will be sustained into second quarter and throughout the year."

Analysts predict the Spanish-language figures will look discernibly different as the year progresses, especially with the loss of the television revenues mostly generated by last year's World Cup. The total TV intake was $4.28 billion, a rise of 13.9 percent over 2005.

Swallen predicts the second quarter figures will look "comparatively weak" from last year, but the full picture won't be known until third quarter when expenditures won't be weighted against the World Cup.

Still, seven out of the top 10 major advertisers in Hispanic media in first quarter 2007 increased their buys by 3.6 percent compared to the same time last year, according to TNS.

Most notable are bigger budgets from Procter & Gamble (up 8.3 percent to $39.8 million), Walt Disney Co. (up 13.2 percent to $17.7 million) and Sears Holdings (up 29.2 percent to $16.9 million).

The automobile category has yet to climb back up to its former glory years. With the exception of Toyota, which grew 3.8 percent to $16.2 million in the first quarter, other auto companies such as General Motors and Ford Motor Co. decreased their overall expenditures from the same time last year.

While revenue for Hispanic magazines was up 14.3 percent to $35.6 million, newspapers were down 1.9 percent to $83.4 million, a consequence of budgets moving to online among other factors.