Advertisement

TDA Rides With Bikestore.com

Advertisement




Client Warns That Its Rivals Offer the Wrong Kind of Adventures
LOS ANGELES--A print campaign from TDA Advertising & Design positions new client Bikestore.com as the only site cycling buffs can visit without ending up with extraneous referrals to unrelated sites.
The ads, which break this month in cycling and outdoor sports enthusiast publications, are the first from the Boulder, Colo., shop since it won the estimated $2 million account in March.
One ad shows a woman in a cycling helmet cautiously eyeing a man wearing a Star Trek outfit--complete with pointed ears--who is holding a glass of wine in one hand and offering a Vulcan salute with the other. The Web site address "www.trekkingfrance.com" appears near the nerdy Trekkie. Copy reads: "Don't get lost looking for bike info."
Additional copy advises users to "Connect to trails, research products, visit bike stores, and access cycling's only search engine."
Another ad shows a cyclist being hugged by beer-swilling men alongside the Web address www.trailbuddies.com; a third shows a rider being mauled by mud wrestlers, next to the address www.mudlovers.com.
"We wanted to avoid that classic riding shot, and we wanted these ads to translate for a lot of different audiences," said agency creative director/copywriter Jonathan Schoenberg. "Your uncle could see these ads and relate to them."
Schoenberg said the campaign arose from research into competitors' sites. "We started looking at them and ended up in all these weird places," he said.
Should consumers decide to check out the fictitious sites, they are automatically sent to Bikestore.com.
The agency also had a stroke of good luck in casting the Star Trek ad. The pictured Trekkie is actually a freelance computer staffer the agency uses, and an avid Star Trek fan--he even supplied his own costume.
"He's going to be the emcee at this spring's National Star Trek Convention," Schoenberg added.
In addition to Schoenberg, the creative team included art directors Thomas Dooley and Dan Richardson, copywriter Eric Liebhauser and photographer Brooks Freehill. K