'Taking Care' of Office Depot | Adweek
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'Taking Care' of Office Depot

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Gold Coast Regains Creative Account, Business Focus of Retailer
ATLANTA--In the end, it all came down to "Taking care of business."
Bachman Turner Overdrive's classic rock radio staple and the tagline inspired by it are back at the center of a new campaign for Office Depot. It was also the reason the account returned to its longtime agency, Gold Coast Advertising, after three years at as many shops.
"If you look at the category . . . there may have been a tendency [to] focus advertising and marketing a little more at a consumer base, instead of focusing at businesses," said Bob Utsman, Gold Coast chairman. "The target of Office Depot should be the business community, from small and medium to the giants of industry. "
The Delray Beach, Fla.-based retailer left the Miami shop in 1996 for J. Walter Thompson in Chicago. Following a failed merger with Staples, the account moved to Wyse Advertising in Cleveland, which built a consumer-focused campaign around comic strip character Dilbert.
Most recently, New York's DeVito/Verdi had the account. It produced a series of commercials Office Depot spokesman Gary Schweikhart called "just okay . . . edgy." He said "the timing was right" to rejoin the agency that helped launch the company in 1987.
"There was already a movement [inside the company] to come back with 'Taking care of business,' and we heard from Gold Coast at just about the same time," Schweikhart said. "We thought we'd meet with them, just as a matter of common courtesy, really, but they came back and they were pushing 'Taking care of business.' It was then we realized: These guys really know us. They were a good agency . . . No advertising agency better understands Office Depot."
The opening words in the first of three new national television spots are: "Nobody sells more office products to more businesses than Office Depot." Two other specialty ads, one for the holidays and another for an Arnold Palmer golf tournament, also use the tag and rock song.
A source said, "The company is in tremendous turmoil" since last summer's management departures, which included Christine Brodie from the ad department and president John Macatee.
Unlike it's first relationship with Office Depot, Gold Coast has only creative duties on the $60 million account. SFM Media in New York has planning and buying.