Red Ball Telling Moores Stories | Adweek
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Red Ball Telling Moores Stories

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Continuing its folksy storytelling approach for men's clothing shops, Red Ball Tiger is rolling out four new TV spots for Moores of Canada, a division of The Men's Wearhouse.

The spots, which will air throughout Canada, use testimonials and stories similar to those in a recent Red Ball campaign for The Men's Wearhouse itself. The Moores campaign is part of a major restructuring that includes revamped stores, higher-quality clothes and additional employee training.

The spots are a continuation of the chain's first TV campaign, but this time plug new items like casual clothing and shoes. Each spot features a story from a customer or employee and presents Moores as the ideal place to buy men's clothing.

"We had to take a look at what we want this brand to stand for and how to make it different from everything else," said Bob Ravasio, managing director of the San Francisco agency. "What's come out of that is a story from customers and employees. It's based on their actual experiences and told through their eyes."

In one 30-second spot, a 6-foot-9-inch man walks through the store picking out clothes from the big and tall section. He says he isn't treated "as an afterthought" and is then seen hailing a cab in a snazzy suit.

The tagline remains: "Well made. Well priced. Well dressed."

In another spot, Moores employee Barb Roberts discusses the store window displays she prepares.

The agency tried to differentiate Moores from stores like The Gap. "A lot of fashion stuff is pretty models running around saying 'Look at my clothing,' and you need to be careful you don't look like them," Ravasio said.

The Moores work "has allowed us to more accurately portray the customer experience in our stores," said Charlie Bresler, evp for The Men's Wearhouse.

Moores spent US$10 million in advertising last year. Billings for this campaign were not disclosed.

The Men's Wearhouse, based in Houston and with executive offices in Fremont, Calif., acquired Moores roughly 18 months ago.