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Ray-Ban Viral Looks to Make a Splash

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LOS ANGELES Omnicom's Cutwater this week released a new viral video for Ray-Ban from Ben "Benzo" Kaller, the director of the popular "Catch" viral.

"Catch," which generated 2.7 million views on YouTube and scored a recent Cyber Lion at Cannes, will be a tough act to follow. Kaller's second video, "Bobbing for Glasses," starring Kaller and his creative partner Steve Hanft, shows the pair dunking their heads into water buckets and surfacing with pair after pair of Wayfarers instead of apples.

"I hope people will wonder how we were able to do it," said Kaller. "Everyone likes a magic show and humor."

After countless speculation about how he created the "Catch" video, in which actors "caught" pairs of glasses on their faces in improbable fashion, Kaller is looking to build some mystery around "Bobbing." Like Hitchcock's Rope, the new clip is supposed to come off as one long take, so Kaller won't acknowledge anything but "rehearsal days" of plugged ears and water-blurred eyes. So he's not giving up the trick, not even disclosing the number of shooting days.

Kaller, 30, typically shoots publicity stills, though he also made music videos for Fatlip ("Worst Case Scenario") and Princess Superstar ("Bad Babysitter"). He was on the set of Jackass Number Two as a still photographer (he still works for The Closer in that capacity, he said). Kaller was conscripted into the movie when he got punked by the creators and had his hair cut off while the camera rolled. Kaller is somewhat taken aback by the success of "Catch" and said he is "very busy" writing treatments for other potential viral videos.

"Worldwide, we're to up to about 11 million views on 'Catch,' " said Josh Warner, president of Feed Company, Los Angeles, which seeded both "Catch" and "Bobbing for Glasses."

"It's hard to strike lightning twice," Warner said. "But we had a great response to Benzo and Steve as characters, and the agency felt they wanted to keep the conversation going, which I really admire as a strategy."

"To some extent, I'm curious to see how popular it becomes," said Kaller. "But I'm mostly happy not to be dunking my head in buckets anymore. Steve and I are like recovering dunkoholics."