NKH&W Helps Yellow Freight Show Its Colors | Adweek NKH&W Helps Yellow Freight Show Its Colors | Adweek
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NKH&W Helps Yellow Freight Show Its Colors

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Company Breaks First TV Spot, Promotes New Delivery Program
CHICAGO--NKH&W in Kansas City, Mo., next month breaks Yellow Freight System's first TV spot in its 75-year history.
While FedEx and other couriers battle for supremacy in sending "lightweight" business packages, Yellow Freight's advertising seeks to set it apart by touting its Exact Express Expedited Air & Ground Delivery, a time- and date-specific delivery service for shipments weighing more than 70 pounds.
In the spot, a harried driver for the fictional "Letter Go Getter" company braves rain, freeways and general anxiety to deliver an overnight letter. He eventually drives his van onto a Yellow Freight truck, reinforcing the message that Yellow specializes in big shipments.
Yellow Freight is not aiming to compete with FedEx and other overnight letter carriers. Rather, the company intends to leverage the recognition those parcel carriers enjoy to build recognition for itself, said Brad Lang, vice president and account group director for NKH&W.
The TV spot is part of an integrated campaign for the new delivery system that included a print ad last week in the Wall Street Journal.
The campaign, tagged "Exactly when you need it," and the time-exact delivery system are elements in Yellow Freight's new push to become more customer-centered, said Greg Reid, senior vice president of marketing for the Overland Park, Kan.-based company. Yellow Freight's competitors include Airborne Freight Corp., Burlington Motor Holdings and several regional freight companies.
"The mere fact that we're using television is really groundbreaking," Reid said. With research showing Yellow Freight's customer base to be avid sports fans, the spot will air on ESPN, ESPN2 and TNN through the fourth quarter.
Yellow Freight spent $1.2 million on advertising last year. Sources estimate spending on the current campaign at $3-5 million. --Aaron Baa