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Meth Ad(dicts) May Go

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Meth Ad(dicts) May Go National

Venables, Bell & Partners in San Francisco has created an antidrug TV, print, radio and outdoor campaign for the Montana Meth Project that is full of grisly images—and now, there is interest in taking it national, the agency said. Directed by Tony Kaye, the spots show young people contemplating using meth for the first time and encountering future versions of their own worn, sickly, addicted selves. Radio spots feature real crystal meth addicts talking about how meth rotted their bodies and turned them to crime. Citing its 96 percent addiction rate for first-time users, the tag is, "Not even once." Ads are funded by Siebel Systems founder Thomas Siebel, who raised about $6 million through his Thomas and Stacey Siebel Foundation.



Advertising as an Art Form

There's been a deluge of art exhibits displaying advertising. At New York's Science, Industry and Business Library, "Opt In to Advertising's New Age" displays print, radio, TV and online advertising from the 18th century to the present. And the Lightbox Gallery in Los Angeles has a show called "Passionate Image: The Body in Art and Advertising," including work by Richard Avedon and David LaChapelle. The show comes to New York's Steven Kasher Gallery in November. Last week, the One Club began a retrospective of ESPN advertising



Champagne for Supermodels

Following Kate Moss' series of unfortunate events, it's nice to see Kirshenbaum Bond + Partners in New York doing its part to keep fashion models in stiletto heels with its first work for Moët & Chandon. Global print ads aim to reinvent the brand by reminding fashionistas that a bit of bubbly can make everyday occasions "Feel Fabulous. Be Fabulous." "Champagne was something you always added to fabulous occasions. ... Each ad is a reinvention of an old rule in a modern, fabulous way," says cd Megan Skelly. One ad's copy dictates, "Always travel with a chauffeur," but instead of a limo driver, a suitor's Vespa awaits. Ads break in November issues of U.S. Vogue and Elle.