M1 Explores Heavenly Ski Resort's 'Many Sides' | Adweek M1 Explores Heavenly Ski Resort's 'Many Sides' | Adweek
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M1 Explores Heavenly Ski Resort's 'Many Sides'

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New Print Ads Position Lake Tahoe Mountain as a Vast Playground
LOS ANGELES--The M1 agency's latest ads for the Heavenly Ski Resort champion the sheer size of the Lake Tahoe attraction and the range of activities available to winter vacationers there.
This new campaign for the resort--located on Heavenly Mountain, a peak that straddles the California-Nevada border in the Lake Tahoe area--continues the tagline, "No other mountain has as many sides," used in previous work from the Santa Monica, Calif., agency.
The campaign begins with nine two-page print spreads. One shows a skier attacking an extreme slope, with text that reads, "Our mountain is home to 4,500 skiable acres, and a few hundred barely skiable ones." The ad outlines Heavenly's various attractions and includes its toll-free number and Web site address.
"It was crucial to develop a campaign that transcends ski industry clichƒs," said Tom Moyer, M1's president and creative director. "This work details the breadth of the Heavenly experience and positions [the resort] as a complete winter destination."
Another ad shows a snowboarder tearing down a slope that has been sculpted to a corduroy-like texture. Copy reads: "You could have closed Nevada's oldest tavern. You could have played craps 'til dawn. You could have ignored that wake-up call. You could have done all those things. But then you would have been hitting the aspirin. Instead of the corduroy."
The print ads break in September issues of ski publications. The campaign's second phase, due to break in the fall as the ski season begins, will expand to include TV, radio and outdoor executions in key national markets.
The agency also created a new logo--the letter H formed by two linked snowboards--that appears in the new ads and will be extended to the resort's clothing line and other merchandise this winter.
M1 won the estimated $2-3 million account in a review in April 1997.