Lowe Keeps Shaking Up Chocolate Milk | Adweek Lowe Keeps Shaking Up Chocolate Milk | Adweek
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Lowe Keeps Shaking Up Chocolate Milk

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NEW YORK In the latest TV spot for MilkPEP by Lowe, breaking at the end of the month, a mountain biker heads down a steep hill. Just when it looks as if he will make it, he flips and slides down the slope. At the bottom, he reaches into his backpack ... and pulls out his chocolate milk, freshly shaken.

The ad is one of three in the New York agency's new chocolate milk campaign for MilkPEP. Two other spots broke last month. A previous campaign, which ran late last year, showed a shivering man in an arctic setting shaking up chocolate milk for his would-be rescuers and a teen turning up a stereo at a store so it vibrates enough to shake up his chocolate milk.

"The theme again is the same, 'Shake stuff up,' " said Lowe evp, executive creative director Hank Kosinski. "We wanted to even twist scenarios a little bit more, but at the same time keep them grounded in reality."

Other spots in this round feature a man altering a bar code on a container of chocolate milk so the checkout employee has to run it back and forth over the UPC code reader and a girl pogo-ing in a living room to shake up the drink. "It's people playing with society in order to have milk way they want it," said Kosinski. The tagline remains, "Got chocolate milk?"

Noam Murro directed the spots out of Biscuit Filmworks in Los Angeles.

"He's got a great filmic sense, a great since of comedy and timing," said Lowe evp, creative group head Eddie Van Bloem, noting that one of Murro's touches was adding twin brothers to the pogo spot.

"With these spots, each one is its own beast, each one is different in its own right," added Kosinski. "The mountain bike one was an exterior spot while 'Pogo Stick' takes place in a living room. We needed someone to be able to cover both sides of the spectrum and Noam did it brilliantly."

The mountain bike spot was filmed on Mt. Baldy in California, and creatives, including art director Bernie Hogya and copywriter Brian Ahern, enlisted three professional stuntmen to ride down the slope, which had a 15-foot drop, and then fall off their bikes.

No one was injured during the shoot. "It was pretty amazing to watch," said Kosinski. "It's one thing to ask a guy to ride down a really steep hill. It's another thing to make them go over the front of their handlebars."