King Thomas Succeeds DiSesa at McCann | Adweek King Thomas Succeeds DiSesa at McCann | Adweek
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King Thomas Succeeds DiSesa at McCann

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NEW YORK Interpublic Group's McCann Erickson has promoted Joyce King Thomas from executive creative director to chief creative officer of its New York office, effective immediately, the agency said.

She succeeds Nina DiSesa, who remains chairman of the $3 billion flagship office.

King Thomas, 48, joined McCann in 1995 as a group creative director from Wells Rich Greene and is best known for helping to create MasterCard's "Priceless" campaign, which has been running since 1997.

In addition to MasterCard, she works on McCann's Verizon Wireless, Staples and Nikon accounts but will now oversee the agency's entire creative product. Other clients in New York include, Microsoft Xbox, L'Oreal, Rolling Rock, Johnson & Johnson, Capital One, Pfizer, Lowe's Home Centers, Unilever, Avis and Wendy's.

In a statement, DiSesa said, "There is no one better to assume the role of chief creative officer of the New York agency than Joyce. She is a brilliant creative person and a respected, inspiring leader—two qualities that don't always go hand-in-hand in this business. I am proud to have her as our next creative leader."

Besides Wells Rich Greene, King Thomas has worked at Young & Rubicam. During her career, she has created advertising for accounts such as Marriott, Gateway, Braniff, Pan Am, Kraft General Foods, Colgate and Chase Manhattan Bank.

DiSesa, 58, joined McCann in New York for the second time in 1994 as executive creative director. In 1998, she became chairman and chief creative officer, partnering with then general manager Eric Keshin.

King Thomas continues to report to DiSesa and Keshin.

In a statement, McCann North America regional director Keshin, said, "Nina is an extraordinary leader who has consistently made huge contributions to our clients' businesses and to our own. Her decision to pass the day-to-day creative responsibilities for McCann N.Y. to Joyce will allow her to devote more time to clients and to broad-based creative initiatives."