BE&P Adds 'Franchise Player' | Adweek BE&P Adds 'Franchise Player' | Adweek
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BE&P Adds 'Franchise Player'

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Looking to add some "franchise players" to its management ranks, Barkley Evergreen & Partners has hired account veteran Ginny Shiverdecker as its chief strategic officer.

"We're looking for a man-agement team that comes from a diverse background," said Scott Aylward, the Kansas City, Mo., agency's CEO. "We want to have franchise players leading all disciplines."

Shiverdecker comes to BK&E from Campbell Mithun in Minneapolis, where she was an executive vice president in account management. She will take over day-to-day management along with president and creative director Brian Brooker, who joined the agency in 2000 from GSD&M.

At Campbell Mithun, Shiver-decker managed the $100 million Kmart account before it went to TBWA\Chiat\Day in September 2000. Prior to her five-year tenure at CM, she was the general manager of Doner's regional office in Tampa, Fla.

In the newly created position, Shiverdecker will lead the agency's second-largest account, the $60 million Payless ShoeSource business, assist with new business and offer strategic counsel for the agency's clients.

"I have two clients—Payless and Barkley Evergreen," Shiverdecker said. Her initial task for Payless will include "re-engineering" the brand with a campaign featuring a new spokeswoman, Star Jones, star of the television show The View. That work is expected to break in March.

Aylward said he'll look to Shiverdecker to bring a level of expertise to the agency's roster of non-category-leading "challenger brands" that tend to spend less than their competitors on advertising.

"Any additional intel-lectual capacity we can bring to the party is going to help our clients," Aylward said, noting that the agency itself could be considered a challenger brand.

Shiverdecker had considered positions at larger, New York-based agencies but said BE&P's size and spirit won her over.

"I felt like I could make a difference in this organization and be valued for what I could bring," she said. "I felt for my value system, I would be put in a box [at other agencies]."