Wieden & Kennedy has landed the $25 million ad account of Scout Electromedia | Adweek Wieden & Kennedy has landed the $25 million ad account of Scout Electromedia | Adweek
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Wieden & Kennedy has landed the $25 million ad account of Scout Electromedia

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Wieden & Kennedy has landed the $25 million ad account of Scout Electromedia, a tech startup with plans to launch a new generation of handheld devices.
Wieden, Portland, Ore., picked up the account following an informal review of undisclosed shops.
"We needed an agency that understood the 18- to 34-year-old demographic and also knew how to brand. They don't get a whole lot better than Wieden," said Cynthia Spence, chief marketing officer at Scout, San Francisco.
The client plans to launch its first product, code-named "Modo," in June in New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco. The device, about the size of a stopwatch, allows users to tap into regionally tailored information, broadcast daily, such as entertainment and restaurant listings. A second phase of the rollout is due in August in Chicago, Boston and Atlanta. Scout plans to take the service international.
"We believe there is a large market for wireless lifestyle handheld devices targeted at segments
of the population greater than the mobile professional," Spence said.
The device will retail for about $90, with no service charges.
Kim Lilly, who will head up the account at Wieden, said the agency didn't present creative, but won the account after chemistry meetings.
"We brought people to the table who would quickly solve the issues of bringing a new product to market and making it successful," she said. "They liked our experience with Nike and other clients that showed we understand the mind-set of 21- to 34-year-olds."
Teaser ads will break in the three launch markets in May, Spence said.
Lilly said the campaign is still being formulated, but will likely include a guerrilla element. TV will likely not be used until the holiday season, Spence said.
Scout was formed in January 1999 by three Stanford graduates. It has venture capital backing from Chase Financial Partners, Flatiron Partners and TechFund Capital.