In Terms of Distribution This Joint Juice Is Jumpin' | Adweek In Terms of Distribution This Joint Juice Is Jumpin' | Adweek
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In Terms of Distribution This Joint Juice Is Jumpin'

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As “Joe the Plumber” overflows with opinions on the state of our nation, an army of average Joes crawls around unclogging pipes, moving furniture and laying carpet. Those who do the heavy lifting of construction work and other blue-collar jobs seek some relief from the aches and pains gained during a day’s labor. Joint Juice wants to be their Gatorade.

The doctor-created beverage contains a day’s supply of glucosamine, a naturally occurring substance that hydrates joints and helps build the cartilage needed to cushion them. While Joint Juice’s claims are not evaluated by the FDA, research indicates that taking the 1,500 mg in a daily serving can improve overall joint function and mobility.

It was during a Costco road show that Joint Juice CEO Jack Robertson got a chance to meet some of these jacks-of-all-trades who toil on our toilets and care for our cars. At these sampling events, emerging brands have a chance to introduce products to customers at a club store, and for Robertson, this was where the vision of his true market materialized.

Joint Juice had been envisioned as sort of an antidote for arthritics and the aged. These folks came to the Costco table, but so did America’s blue collar brigade—in droves.

“That’s where we got the takeaway that [this product appealed to] 30-year-old plumbers and 40-year-old bricklayers,” said Robertson, a consumer packaged goods vet who had stints at Procter & Gamble and Clorox before consulting for Joint Juice. He eventually joined the company in 2002. “This wasn’t my grandmother, this was a much broader market that was experiencing pain.”

Orthopedic surgeon Dr. Kevin Stone created Joint Juice in 1999 as an easy-to digest alternative to the horse pills his patients were taking—and reporting relief from—to get their glucosamine dose. Many of his patients were athletes, though many people develop joint dryness, swelling and pain from chronic illness such as arthritis from just plain aging as well as exertion.


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