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NFL Calls for Super Bowl Spot

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NEW YORK The NFL will add its own twist to reality TV when it runs a commercial during Super Bowl XLI that has been conceived by a fan.

The concept, "Pitch us your idea for the best NFL Super Bowl commercial ever. Seriously," was unveiled today by the league. It will officially launch Oct. 31 online at www.NFL.com/superad, where visitors will be given details on the contest.

The NFL said it would be looking for a "Super Bowl commercial that has to be football related, with no other brands featured." The winning entry will become a 30-second spot directed by Joe Pytka and air during Super Bowl XLI on CBS, Feb. 4, 2007. Pytka said he has directed more than 5,000 commercials, including more than 40 Super Bowl spots, the most by one director, which include ads for Gatorade, McDonald's and Pepsi.

There will be several steps before the winning entry is selected, according to the NFL. After following the directions to be posted at the site, the league in November and December will host events in three NFL markets to gather pitches from fans: Nov. 17-18 at Giants Stadium, East Rutherford, N.J.; Dec. 1-2 at Texas Stadium, Irving, Texas; and Dec. 8-9 at Invesco Field at Mile High, Denver.

The field will be narrowed to 12 by Dec. 15, and finalists pitches will be posted on nfl.com/superad.

The winning pitch will be determined by a panel including Pytka and other to-be-named judges who will consist of representatives from categories such as marketing, advertising and media. Fans also will be urged to vote at the Web site from Dec. 15-Jan. 7. The winner will be announced on Jan. 8, 2007. The winner will get to watch his or her concept turned into a TV spot, and with a guest will receive an all-expense-paid trip to Miami to see the game.

Chevrolet and Frito-Lay have also asked consumers to vie for the opportunity to create a TV spot that will run during Super Bowl XLI. The cost of buying time for a 30-second spot during the Super Bowl could top $2 million, based on past figures.