E-Mail Named Tops for 'Targeting' | Adweek E-Mail Named Tops for 'Targeting' | Adweek
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E-Mail Named Tops for 'Targeting'

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A newly released Datran Media survey of executives at Fortune 500 companies, publishing companies, media agencies and ad agencies finds e-mail and search regarded as the digital channels that worked best last year.

Conducted in December in conjunction with the Direct Marketing Association E-mail Experience Council "and other media partners," the survey asked respondents to identify the digital channels that "performed the strongest for your company in 2009." E-mail got the most mentions (cited by 39 percent), followed by search (24 percent), offline (9 percent), affiliate marketing (9 percent), display (7 percent), direct mail (6 percent), social media (5 percent) and mobile (1 percent).

Another part of the survey inquired into the objectives these executives have for their online efforts. "Reaching a target audience" topped the list (cited by 84 percent), followed by "generating high-quality leads" (74 percent). Smaller majorities said they're using online efforts for "converting leads into sales" (63 percent), "measuring and understanding our audience" (60 percent), "retaining existing customers" (57 percent) and/or "digitally transacting with customers" (54 percent). Consistent with the interest in reaching a target audience, respondents put "targeting" atop the list of online "marketing tactics" they'll be using this year as part of their online strategy.

When it comes to measuring consumer response to their digital efforts, what do the respondents' companies currently look at? "Clicks" got the most mentions (72 percent), trailed by "conversions" (59 percent) and "impressions" (58 percent). Lagging farther behind were "transactions" and "audience" (43 percent apiece).

Elsewhere in the survey, 67 percent of respondents said they'll be "leveraging online video this year." As for social media, opinion was mixed on the question of whether it will "generate quantifiable results in 2010." Fifty percent of respondents said they think it will, but 12 percent said it won't and the rest were unsure.