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Carat Is the Big Winner in Mondelez Media Contest

Parent company of popular brands shifts work from MediaVest

Mondelez spends roughly $200 million a year on U.S. advertising for its popular snack brands. Photos: Getty Images; illustration: Dianna McDougall

Following a four-month review restricted to its two main roster shops, Mondelez International has selected Dentsu Aegis' Carat for North American media chores and also named the agency network to handle global communications across all product categories.

The North American media and global communications work for biscuits (cookies), gum and candy brands shifts to Carat from Publicis Groupe's MediaVest. (Previously, Carat handled global communications for the client's chocolate brands only.)

Other media assignments remain unchanged. Carat continues to handle Mondelez in the Asia-Pacific region and most of Europe, while MediaVest retains chores across Asia, Eastern Europe, the Middle East and Latin America.

All told, the client spends an estimated $1.5 billion annually on worldwide media, including roughly $200 million in North America. Mondelez counts Oreo, Cadbury, Trident, Wheat Thins, Nabisco and Ritz among its many brands.

The desire to lower costs drove the selection process, and the realignment is expected to yield savings next year of more than 10 percent. Those funds "can be re-invested in our long-term growth," said Bonin Bough, Mondelez chief media and e-commerce officer, in a statement. Doug Ray, U.S. CEO and global president at Carat, said his network's enhanced standing with Mondelez is "aligned with our ambition to redefine the role that media plays in driving their transformative growth." MediaVest did not immediately respond to Adweek's request for comment.

The new appointments take effect on Jan. 1.

Mondelez was among several large players that launched media reviews this year. Some competitions, including those staged by Coca-Cola, SC Johnson and General Mills, have reached their conclusions. Yesterday, MetLife consolidated its $100 million U.S. media buying account without a formal review.

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