Web Shopping Site Assigns Whole Shabang!




Hadeler Sullivan & Law Acquires Creative, Media, PR Duties
DALLAS–An online shopping service budgeting $21 million in paid media through 1999 has hired Hadeler Sullivan & Law (HS&L) here as its agency.
Shopping Community Inc. (SCI), a four-year-old Plano, Texas, company founded by two former Microsoft executives, assigned HS&L creative, media and public relations duties for the fall rollout of its Internet site currently code-named Shabang!.
HS&L chairman David Hadeler said the account will be the largest ever held by the $54 million agency.
“They’ve committed serious funds to launch this professionally,” Hadeler told Adweek.
The Shabang! venue will function as an online search engine, connecting customers with numerous sources of merchandise and services. Shabang! will draw revenue from companies listed on the site, rather than from online consumer fees, according to company chief executive officer Ray Falkner, co-founder with SCI chief technology officer Bob Wood.
A fall campaign that will include print advertising, public relations and trade show coordination is alone estimated at $5 million, Falkner said. Spending for 1999 will be $16 million.
“HS&L’s orientation and their goals matched the energy we had,” said Falkner.
The agency will coordinate print and radio advertising, while sister unit Hadeler White Public Relations will be responsible for sales recruitment seminars, media relations and trade show activities.
SCI and Dallas-based consultant Jim Lucero contacted three local agencies: HS&L, Evans Advertising (prior to its acquisition by Publicis) and Gleason Calise Associates, according to Lucero. Lucero said no formal presentations were made.
Falkner previously served as a regional director for Microsoft, overseeing product sales and marketing in an 18-state Central region. Wood was a senior consultant at the software developer.
The company’s goal is to sell $50 million worth of merchandise and services through Shabang! by 2000, and as much as $500 million in five years, according to Falkner.