New Campaigns: New England

Client: Renaissance Solutions, Lincoln, Mass.
Agency: McDougall Associates, Peabody, Mass.
Creative Director: Dana Jones
Copywriters: Dana Jones and Alana Rossi
Art Directors: Marygrace Gravallese and Becky Choate
Positioning a management consulting company can be daunting. Luckily for McDougall Associates, its client had a name that begged to be the center of attention. The result is five print ads with jaunty visuals reminiscent of Leonardo da Vinci’s notebook. The executions carry the tagline, “Making strategies work.”
One ad, titled “1997 AD: The Renaissance of the Corporation,” shows five drawings. As the sketches become more and more developed, they evolve from “thesis” to “antithesis,” followed by “synthesis” and, finally, “renaissance.”
“Consulting . . . can get very complicated,” said creative director Dana Jones. “We didn’t want to explain the entire process, and that’s when we came up with the series of symbols that would express what [Renaissance] was about.”
The campaign is the client’s first. It targets chief executive officers and other corporate decision makers. The effort is scheduled to run in Business Week and Harvard Business Review through the spring of 1998. -Sarah Jones



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Client: Shiva Corp., Bedford, Mass.
Agency: Allen & Gerritsen, Watertown, Mass.
Creative Directors: Mick O’Brien (copywriter) and Doug Chapman
Art Director/ Illustrator: Marcy Levey
In a print campaign for Shiva Corp., Allen & Gerritsen positions the software company as the “remote access specialists.” The executions feature an offbeat visual style, using illustrations that are both childlike and sophisticated. For example, the text of one ad substitutes a stylized pig-with its belly full of pennies-for the word “bank” in a headline touting Shiva’s LanRover Power-Up series of products.
The images were created by art director Marcy Levey, using ASCII technology to give the print campaign the look and feel of a Web site. Computer art was used because it is “all the rage on the Web right now and very popular with technoids,” said Allen & Gerritsen co-creative director Mick O’Brien. “We wanted to have colorful, simple graphics for a complex product,” he said. “When I see those ads in magazines . . . they really stand out.”
The executions target network managers and are breaking nationwide in technology publications. Allen & Gerritsen first began working for Shiva Corp. last year on a project basis. -David Gianatasio

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Client: Eagle Bank, Bristol, Conn.
Agency: O’Neal & Prelle, Hartford, Conn.
Creative Director: Brad Londy
Copywriter: Brad Londy
Art Director: Steve Martin
Director: Brad Londy
When the fifth-largest bank in Connecticut changed its name to Eagle Bank, it assigned O’Neal & Prelle the task of crafting an image campaign that captured its new identity.
“The way to powerfully portray this story in an inspirational and memorable way is through the bank’s distinctive symbol: the eagle,” said Bill Ervin, chief executive officer of O’Neal & Prelle.
“While we weren’t hearing any major negatives, we [noticed] a general uncertainty and dilution of Eagle’s image,” said Rosellyn Giampietro, the client’s director of marketing.
Print executions combine the image of an eagle with headlines such as “More than a symbol, a way of doing business” and “More than an identity, a vision for the future.” One ad’s copy reads, “Quick, responsive and resourceful, the eagle has long been an inspiration for us in the way we do business.” The copy continues with a list of the bank’s services and products and concludes, “To learn more about what makes The Eagle different, call us.”
The $500,000 mixed media campaign broke in July under the new tagline, “Our standards are higher.” A 30-second television spot, cut into 10- and 15-second versions, broke on network and cable television stations in the Hartford, Conn., area. Three print executions are running in daily and business newspapers. -Sarah Jones