Onesuch Crafts Value Message For Samsung's Korean Car Intro | Adweek Onesuch Crafts Value Message For Samsung's Korean Car Intro | Adweek
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Onesuch Crafts Value Message For Samsung's Korean Car Intro

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OneSuch Films here has completed production on Samsung Motors' inaugural campaign for its first passenger car.
TV and print ads, running only in South Korea where the car went on sale in late March, aim to portray the fledgling automaker as a premier brand with a commitment to quality and service. The launch represents the client's long-awaited debut in the automotive category.
OneSuch's launch ads follow print and teaser broadcast work that ran earlier this year. The campaign was developed around a "Feel the touch of value in time" marketing concept.
"The word 'value' in Korean [connotes] more than just money," said OneSuch executive producer Brian Donnelly. "It means praiseworthy, good. It's about who you are."
Donnelly's creative team included U.S. car advertising veterans Pam Cunningham and Dan Mountain, who served as art director and copywriter, respectively [Adweek, Dec. 15, 1997]. John St. Clair directed the spots; Don Popielarz was the project manager.
Both the 15-second teasers and the 30-second launch TV spot show sophisticated-looking men and women peering through optical devices to view a bright silver object approaching from across the Mojave Desert. The launch ad reveals what the attention is all about: the arrival of the KPQ2 car.
OneSuch won the estimated $10 million account late last year after a review that included Houston Herstek Favat in Boston, which teamed with Fahrenheit Films in Los Angeles.
OneSuch worked with Cheil Communications, the ad and project management unit of the Samsung Group here on both TV and initial print ads. The Cheil team was led by vice president and creative director David Cho. Bright Strategic Design in Marina del Rey, Calif., created brochure materials.
Samsung's goal is to become Korea's fifth-largest car maker, behind Hyundai, Daewoo, Kia and Ssangyong. The firm, however, has scaled back its export plans. It is not expected to enter the U.S. until after 2003.