Mintz Adds Cigna Assignment | Adweek
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Mintz Adds Cigna Assignment

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boston—Mintz & Hoke has picked up advertising chores for Cigna Retirement & Investment Services.

The Avon, Conn., agency added the work following a review of undisclosed agencies with relevant industry experience, according to Jamie Kalamarides, senior vp of marketing and product development at Cigna Retirement.

The budget was not disclosed. Previously, Cigna Retirement worked with various shops on a project basis, including Riley & Partners, Middletown, Conn.

"Mintz & Hoke brought the right combination of creative talent and good strategic thinking, and they went the extra mile in understanding our needs and the marketplace," Kalamarides said.

He also cited the chemistry between his marketing department and the pitch team, led by Mintz & Hoke president Chris Knopf and evp, director of account services Bill Field.

Mintz & Hoke will work with the Bloomfield, Conn.-based client to pro mote its capabilities and position in the marketplace. Cigna Retirement will work closely with Cigna's corporate marketing department, led by Robert Rom asco, in creating the campaign, Kalamarides said. Cigna will continue to handle corporate advertising through its corporate lead agency, DDB, New York.

Mintz & Hoke has begun developing direct marketing materials, collateral and interactive marketing materials targeting benefits managers, human resources profes sionals, chief financial officers and others involved in retirement and investment services. A print component is also in the works, according to Knopf.

Knopf said the win adds to the agency's experience in financial services, a key industry in Connecticut. The agency counts Webster Bank and MassMutual among similar clients.

"This is a very significant event for Mintz & Hoke," Knopf said. "It's technical, complex, multi faceted and cuts across every discipline."

Last year Mintz & Hoke claimed $65 mil lion in billings, adding chores for Electric Boat, Sikorsky Aircraft and The Hartford Courant.