Advertisement

Green Mountain Energy Consolidates at Zimmerman

Advertisement

Green Mountain En-ergy has awarded its $8 million account to The Zimmerman Agency.

"This is a very competitive, rapidly evolving category," said John Savage, chief marketing officer at GME. "We didn't need another agency, we needed a partner that could combine innovative brand development, client service and outstanding creative. Zimmerman proved to be that partner."

Founded in Burlington, Vt., GME is an energy marketer serving consumers in California, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Connecticut. It purchases electricity from renewable sources such as wind and water, as well as power generated from natural gas and oil. The company recently shifted its operations to Austin, Texas.

"This relationship has to do with destiny," said Curtis Zimmerman, a principal at the Tallahassee, Fla., agency. "Energy is a hot category and Green Mountain is a sexy brand."

Industry sources had suggested the client would open the account to a national review. A relationship with the incumbent, The Cullinan Group in Minneapolis, was terminated in January.

Deciding against a review, GME consolidated its account at Zimmerman after the shop completed a set of creative assignments. The work introduced GME to the Connecticut market under the tag, "Change. It's in your power." The agency also created a national customer rewards program called "PowerPerks."

"They've had multiple markets and messages," said Zimmerman. "We will conceive a single brand message to be used in all markets, then develop others specific to each state."

Initial efforts for the branding campaign, which includes television and newspapers, will break in June and be tied to the company's Texas launch. A second effort will break in September when GME enters the Ohio market.

"They're forward thinkers not concerned about the board of directors, but with how people view them and why people should use them," said agency vice president and creative director Eddie Snyder. "You see lots of denims, clogs and ponytails, but the thinking is all Fortune 500."