Advertisement

Coots Rises To Worldwide Post At TBWA

Advertisement

A third senior executive at TBWA\Chiat\Day has been promoted as part of TBWA Worldwide's drive to recast at the top.

Laurie Coots, chief marketing officer for North America since 1997, is now CMO worldwide-a new position. She reports to Carl Johnson, the newly minted chief operating officer worldwide.

The other recently promoted lieutenant is Tom Carroll, who is now president of the Americas [Adweek, April 9]. All three have ascended under the leadership of Jean-Marie Dru, the new TBWA Worldwide CEO.

The Los Angeles-based Coots has spent 17 years at the agency in an assortment of roles, including new business director, COO and CMO. As such, she has contributed greatly to the growth in size and stature of the shop, Johnson said.

Johnson, who has worked with Coots in several new-business pitches, including those for Citibank and Circuit City, added: "Her understanding of the new-business process, and her relationships in the industry will prove invaluable as we move to raise the profile of the agency."

Like Johnson and Carroll, Coots, 44, retains the duties of her previous job. Johnson and Carroll are presidents of TBWA\C\D's New York and Playa del Rey, Calif., offices, respectively.

In her global post, Coots steers a marketing team that includes Tim Nicholls, director of business development worldwide, and Jeremy Miller, director of public relations worldwide. She will continue to live in Los Angeles but plans to spend about a third of her time in New York, which she described as the "gateway for global new business."

Although new business will remain her focus, Coots also will concentrate on how to brand the agency-both internally and externally-and diversify its offerings. Other priorities include expanding existing client relationships and fostering unity within the $6.5 billion network.

Summing up, Coots said: "The big part of my job is to make sure that it's never a level playing field, that we always have an advantage [over the competition]."