CMP Launches DataPop | Adweek CMP Launches DataPop | Adweek
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CMP Launches DataPop

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TechWeb, the technology news network division of Manhasset, N.Y.-based CMP Media, today introduced DataPop, a marketing technology that encourages user click through by alleviating some of the persistent irritations of banner ads. The new DataPop technology will appear on TechWeb sites such as NetworkComputing.com, InformationWeek.com and InternetWeek.com.

According to Mike Grover, director of marketing for TechWeb, "people don't click on ad banners because they're very task-oriented. It isn't that they aren't interested; they just don't want to interrupt what they're doing." DataPop lets site visitors continue their work on a given site and informs them when there's an offer that might be of interest to them by placing a "Pop!" icon at the upper right of an ad banner. If a user clicks on the icon, a new browser window opens, preserving the user's place on the Web site, but presenting them with a form they can fill out to receive product information by e-mail.

HTML-based e-mail is sent to those who request it via CMP servers, not directly from the advertiser. "That way, we preserve our relationship with the user," said Grover. "The user sees CMP DataPop at the top of the e-mail, and, via our privacy policy, we promise not to provide users' e-mail addresses to advertisers unless they ask us to."

CMP charges $5 or more for each e-mail sent to a user. Grover noted that advertisers save the cost of doing their own mailings. In addition, the program adds nothing else to a company's costs: the DataPop logo is merely added to existing banners, while the e-mails can be sourced from an advertiser's existing Web pages.

"This does not require advertisers to spend any extra money on creative development," said Sarah Faye, president of Carat Interactive. "It's a great way to help our clients elicit higher response rates from interested prospects."

From Adweek's Technology Marketing magazine (Formerly Marketing Computers magazine)