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Chicken Redux On Air

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Austin Kelley's Second TV Flight Takes Wing
ATLANTA--Austin (eth)Kelley Advertising broke the second phase of a television campaign for Churchs Chicken this month. The Atlanta agency also added Reynolds Plantation's $1 million account to its client roster.
The new TV spots carry through on the first flight of ads, which positioned the client's chicken as being so good that it drives people to extraordinary distraction. Ads continue the popular "Gotta have it" tagline.
The three spots in the latest incarnation again use the character of Randy and the chain's "celebrity" spokesdog Peppa, this time with the addition of Randy's friend, Gene.
In "Science Fair," Randy and Gene are judging elementary school projects. As they are ready to hand the top prize to a child's complex experiment, they see a boy who has devised a mechanical arm that has only one simple function--opening a box of Churchs' chicken.
In "Picnic," the duo is part of a large group chased inside by a sudden shower. When Randy realizes the Churchs biscuits are still outside, he attempts a rescue. Randy cuts short his mission when he sees Peppa, decked out in a rain slicker, holding an umbrella over the biscuits.
The TV ad series is running in select markets in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Louisiana, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Arizona, New Mexico and Oklahoma.
Among agency personnel receiving production credits are executive creative director Jim Spruell, art director Peggy Redfern, copywriters Mike McGinty and Cathy Lepik, producer Sheryl Jessing and account director Jane Matthews-Fillo.
The shop won the Reynolds Plantation account after a credentials presentation that included other undisclosed agencies. The business had been with Leslie Advertising in Greenville, S.C., which split with the client over a conflict, according to Austin Kelley president Jeff Nixon.
Reynolds is a residential and golf community north of Atlanta on Lake Oconee. Its three courses all carry the right pedigree, having been designed by Bob Cupp (with pro players Fuzzy Zoeller and Hubert Green), Jack Nicklaus and Tom Fazio.
"[Reynolds] is what created Lake Oconee," said Nixon. "To get a chance to work with them is a great opportunity for the agency."
The account win brings the shop's billings to more than $85 million.