Award-winning producer Jennifer Golub downplays he | Adweek
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Award-winning producer Jennifer Golub downplays he

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Award-winning producer Jennifer Golub downplays her contributions to the work of TBWA\Chiat\Day. "I think it's appropriate that we don't get the credit," she says, describing the true role of a producer. "Being invisible is a testimony to a job well done. I don't think we should be a presence. I think we should be enabling an idea."

While Golub serves as executive producer on Apple Computer for the agency's Playa del Rey, Calif., office, it is her role as director of broadcast production at TBWA\C\D in San Francisco that dominates her time. She has produced 60 commercials for Levi's this year, including a recent spot featuring a badger enticed by the sound of Levi's cords. For Levi's "Make Them Your Own" campaign, a branding effort revealing people's solitary antics when trying on jeans, Golub says she ensured her own success by enlisting director Spike Jonze.

Golub also played a significant role in the launch campaign for Levi's Engineered Jeans. Shot on location in Tokyo and Iceland, the inventive commercials use strobes and photography to simulate movement. Icelandic recording artists GusGus directed and provided the music. "Working with GusGus is a reminder of what's wonderful about being a producer: helping to create a venue for artists and creating a distinctive expression for the client," says Golub.

An 11-year veteran of TBWA\C\D, working under the stewardship of TBWA Worldwide chairman and chief creative officer Lee Clow, the New York native began her career in moving images as an independent filmmaker and student at the School of Visual Arts in New York.

Golub's skills were tapped beyond her role as producer for the 1998 launch of Apple's "Think different" campaign. She directed, produced and co-art directed the Emmy award-winning introductory commercial employing rare footage of Albert Einstein, Pablo Picasso and Mahatma Gandhi.

Golub says her greatest challenge this year has been developing a team and establishing a culture in the 2-year-old San Francisco office. Her main objective has been assembling and developing the talents of the filmmakers, musicians and "Web savants" who serve in her 25-member production department. "I want to ensure that there is a high level of excellence," says Golub, describing an effective producer as "a hybrid of a business and a creative person."

In an industry often dominated by flash and personality, associates say Golub is one of the more modest but talented souls on the scene. "She believes in the role of the producer as facilitator," says TBWA\C\D creative director Robert Smiley. "Her real strength has shone through."