Computer Chip to Rescue Advanced Micro Devices Ad Spoofs Job Pressure



By John Spooner





BOSTON–‘Jones. Jones. JONES!’ screams a stressed out boss at an architectural firm in a new ad for Advanced Micro Devices by Hill, Holliday, Connors, Cosmopulos in Boston. ‘If I don’t have that presentation . . . on my desk in 30 seconds, you’re fired!’





As he listens to his boss rant, Jones realizes that a runaway tanker truck is barreling towards the firm’s first floor offices. Instead of bolting, he turns calmly to his PC and puts the finishing touches on the presentation. He does it because he knows that if the truck does not get him, his boss will. He also knows that with the speed of his PC, powered by AMD’s new K6 processor, he can do both. He e-mails the presentation and still has time to grab a jacket and run out the door. Only after the boss receives the presentation does he turn to see the truck, just before it smashes into the building, ending the spot.





The 60-second ad, which broke last week on NBC’s Seinfeld, is the crown jewel of a campaign supporting the launch of the new chip. It also works to further develop the brand awareness generated by AMD’s recent @Work campaign. ‘We wanted to take the @Work feel and carry it over,’ said Bob Kennedy, AMD’s manager of corporate advertising. ‘It’s a business situation everyone faces every day, a boss calling and saying, ‘I want X sent to me immediately.’ ‘ Jones is faced with a question. ‘Do I run for my life or do I finish this presentation for my boss?’ Kennedy said. ‘If you’ve got a K6, you can do both.’





Hill, Holliday’s creative team developed the idea for the runaway truck to reflect the hectic pace of most people’s work lives. Although it’s clear that Jones steps out of harm’s way, AMD wanted to leave the fate of the boss–whose surprised expression fills the screen as the ad fades out–open to audience interpretation, Kennedy said. The answer might come in future ads when Jones and his boss are again paired. ‘I wouldn’t be surprised if those two characters appear in other AMD ads,’ he said.





The campaign includes print and on-line elements, which also broke last week. An AMD Web team revamped the company’s site, www.amd.com, and developed banners for sites such as ZDNet and TechWeb. Print ads first appeared in The Wall Street Journal. The media plan calls for use of computer trade weeklies, such as Info World, and PC monthlies like PC World.





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